Can Brazilians understand Spanish?

Spanish. … As such, many Brazilians are able to understand Spanish, though they may not speak it fluently. As with speakers of all minority languages in Brazil, Spanish speakers pop up in clusters. Many of these occur close to Brazil’s borders with other Latin American countries, where Spanish is the primary language.

Can a Portuguese person understand Spanish?

Apart from the difficulties of the spoken language, Spanish and Portuguese also have distinct grammars. … A Spanish speaker and a Portuguese speaker that have never been exposed to each other’s languages will understand around 45% of what the other says. In real life, of course, this is not that common.

Is Spanish harder than Portuguese?

For most native English speakers, Spanish is slightly easier to learn than Portuguese. This is primarily a matter of access. … Another reason Spanish is easier to learn is that pronunciation in Spanish is simpler than in Portuguese. Spanish uses five vowel sounds and has very consistent spelling.

What is the hardest language to learn?

8 Hardest Languages to Learn In The World For English Speakers

  1. Mandarin. Number of native speakers: 1.2 billion. …
  2. Icelandic. Number of native speakers: 330,000. …
  3. 3. Japanese. Number of native speakers: 122 million. …
  4. Hungarian. Number of native speakers: 13 million. …
  5. Korean. …
  6. Arabic. …
  7. Finnish. …
  8. Polish.

Can Italians understand Spanish?

Do Italians understand Spanish? Surprisingly, yes! It is entirely possible for an Italian speaker to understand Spanish, but each person needs to adapt, speak slowly, and sometimes change their vocabulary. Spanish and Italian are two languages that are very close in terms of vocabulary and grammar.

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Why is Portuguese so hard?

Modern Portuguese developed from Galico-Portuguese, a dead language whose nearest living relative is Galego, spoken in Galiza (Galicia) in northern Spain. … Portuguese is guttural with ‘d’ and ‘t’ distinctly pronounced, which is why the Portuguese find it hard not to over stress the ‘ed’ endings of many English words.