How long was the Argentine revolution?

Argentine Revolution (Spanish: Revolución Argentina) was the name given by its leaders to a military coup d’état which overthrew the government of Argentina in June 1966 and began a period of military dictatorship by a junta from then until 1973.

How did the Argentine revolution end?

Argentina declared its independence from Spain at an assembly in Tucumán on July 9, 1816. The Argentine War of Independence ended in with the Battle of Maipú (near Santiago, Chile) in 1818. The Spanish American Wars of Independence continued until the Battle of Ayacucho in Peru 1825.

When did Argentina gain its independence & From whom?

After Argentina gained independence from the Spanish in 1816, the nation was paralyzed by tension between Centralist and Federalist forces.

How many people died in the Argentine revolution?

The junta dubbed left-wing activists “terrorists” and kidnapped and killed an estimated 30,000 people. “Victims died during torture, were machine-gunned at the edge of enormous pits, or were thrown, drugged, from airplanes into the sea,” explains Marguerite Feitlowitz.

Who is a famous person in Argentina?

1. Eva Peron (1919 – 1952) Maria Eva Duarte de Peron was an icon in Argentina well before the film Evita catapulted her into the mainstream international spotlight. The life story of one of Argentina’s most popular First Lady has captured the imagination of the world.

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Why was the Argentine revolution successful?

The result was the removal of Viceroy Baltasar Hidalgo de Cisneros and the establishment of a local government, the Primera Junta (First Junta), on May 25. The junta would eventually become the country of Argentina. It was the first successful revolution in the South American Independence process.

What did Argentina do after gaining independence?

Rector, Universidad Argentina de la Empresa, Argentina. Profesor, Universidad del CEMA y Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Argentina. After de facto Independence from Spain in 1810 the economy of Buenos Aires enjoyed a dramatic improvement in its terms of trade, in the order of 400%.