Why is there lockdown in Chile?

Are Covid deaths rising?

The COVID-19 death toll has started soaring again as the delta variant tears through the nation’s unvaccinated population and fills up hospitals with patients, many of whom are younger than during earlier phases of the pandemic.

Which arm should you take the COVID-19 vaccine in?

Either arm is appropriate for getting the shot. Many individuals, however, select their non-dominant arm. It is entirely up to the individual to choose which arm works best for them. If you sleep on your side, and put pressure on your right arm, it might be best to get the shot in your left arm.

Has anyone tested positive for COVID-19 after vaccine?

Vaccines work to dramatically reduce the risk of developing COVID-19, but no vaccine is perfect. Now, with 174 million people already fully vaccinated, a small portion are experiencing a so-called “breakthrough” infection, meaning they test positive for COVID-19 after being vaccinated.

Can I still spread Covid if I get the COVID-19 vaccine?

Only a small portion of vaccinated individuals end up contracting the disease, though you still can. If contracted, there is still a chance of spreading it to others, which could be extremely dangerous if the household is immunocompromised or unvaccinated.

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What are the odds of getting severe COVID-19 symptoms?

Most people will have mild symptoms and get better on their own. But about 1 in 6 will have severe problems, such as trouble breathing. The odds of more serious symptoms are higher if you’re older or have another health condition like diabetes or heart disease.

What’s the recovery rate of COVID-19?

Experts don’t have information about the outcome of every infection. However, early estimates predict that the overall COVID-19 recovery rate is between 97% and 99.75%.

Are people who have had COVID-19 immune to reinfection?

Although people who have had COVID can get reinfected, naturally acquired immunity continues to evolve over time and antibodies remain detectable for longer than was first anticipated.